Top 3 Best Practices for Podcast Producers

During our sit down with Pavan Bahl, Co-Founder and President of Mouthmedia Network aboard Linerun's PodcastBus in New York City, he explained what goes into a good podcast and how to replicate this process.

 

As a noted leader and community  builder in multiple ecosystems, including fashion, technology and content, Pavan Bahl has become an authority in identifying such leaders.  With his partners Rob Sanchez and Marc Raco, their network of B2B lifestyle podcasts, Mouthmedia, has become a force in the business world, balancing excellent story telling with brand awareness.

During our sit down with Pavan Bahl, Co-Founder and President of Mouthmedia Network about

Linerun’s PodcastBus in New York City, he explained what goes into a good podcast and how to replicate this process.

 

1.      Consistency

According to Pavan, the key to a great podcast, or content in general, is consistency.

You have great content and speakers who have shared their knowledge with you.  You invest a lot of time and effort building up good will and expectations with your audience.  You establish a set time and date when people will expect your content.  But the moment you drop the ball and miss a few weeks, Apple brings you back to earth.  Pavan mentioned explicitly what happens when you skip a few sessions saying, “(Apple) automatically stops auto-downloading into your RSS feed and would need to work to get that back up.” 

In addition, the increasing prevalence and popularity of podcasts as a medium for people to share content is making the space very competitive. 

If you think about it, everything involving consistency seeks to counter the effects of this competitive environment.  As Pavan says, “there’s only a finite amount of time, with the average podcast user listening to 4 hours of content a week and a power listener, 7 hours.”  Take that expected content away from the user, and you’ll more than likely lose that listener for good.  Driving the point even more, podcasters should think of their users as a business thinks of their customers.  Content is the goods and subscriptions and downloads are the currency.  An even exchange must be made to keep all parties happy.

 

2.      Respect

Pavan said something else to keep in mind is that, “great content can suffer from bad quality.”

What does that mean?

While you don’t necessarily need to produce your podcast in a professional setting or with the most expensive professional equipment, you need to pay attention to the quality of your whole operation.  From the sound to the recording to the equipment, no detail should be left unchecked and verified.  When you’re operating in a really intimate experience for users and listeners, you need to be mindful that any audio issue can effect their overall perception of your production and you as an individual. 

 

3.      Community

Community reinforces a human truth – we need people to care about us.

Whether or not you ever get to meet your listeners in person and have all of your interactions with them online or via audio, the fact remains that your community is your number one asset and must be protected. 

To their credit, Pavan and his partners, Rob Sanchez and Marc Raco have always had a community first mantra to all of their podcast related efforts.  Citing their live recording experiences and dinner series for past guests, they want their audience and speakers to always think of them. 

That said, the number one benefit to curating and cultivating your community is that they will follow you if they are engaged with you and your content.  Pavan mentions that the key is to strike a balance between audience and community, calling such actions “transformative for everyone.”